Friends of the Wekiva River Logo
Wekiva River
Wekiva River, Florida

The Wekiva River is a National treasure. This river boasts beautiful vistas and unique ecosystems.

enjoying-the-wekiva-river
Enjoying the River

Help us protect this amazing river so we can all enjoy the river for many more years to come!

Open Space
Navtive Plants

The Wekiva Basin is filled with gorgeous flora and fauna.

Orchids
Otter frolicking

Join us for one of our monthly field trips!

Volunteer FOWR-Volunteers


Ambassadors Program

In 2015, FOWR will launch our Environmental Ambassadors Program. This program will provide students the chance to get involved in protecting and promoting the health of the Wekiva River Basin.

Click here for more information.

Links


Upcoming Events

  • LIVE Turtle Presentation
    Saturday, July 25, 2015 at 10 AM
  • FYN/FFL WINTER CLASSES
    New FREE classes offered through
    Florida Friendly Landscaping

A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE WITHIN FLORIDA 800-435-7352. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. REGISTRATION NUMBER CH42991

 

 

Welcome Note

Since 1982 the Friends of the Wekiva River have worked to protect, preserve, and restore the natural functions and beauty of the Wekiva River system. As a result of our leadership and the cooperation of our river partners, the Wekiva is designated a Florida Outstanding Water, a Florida Canoe Trail, a Florida Wild and Scenic River, and a National Wild and Scenic River with over 70,000 acres of state-protected lands in the basin. Despite this ample recognition, the Wekiva River and its fragile ecosystem face numerous threats.

These include the fragmentation and loss of habitat, declines in spring flow, degradation in water quality, and wildlife mortality on the roads. read more.


Good and Bad Happening Re: Bears in Canada


According to a report on the Public Radio International (PRI), “Two black bear cubs were orphaned earlier this month when their mother was killed for breaking into a meat freezer inside a mobile home in Port Hardy, British Columbia. A conservation officer, Bryce Casavant, was called out to the home when the cubs were discovered clinging to a tree near the place where their mother had been killed. Casavant was ordered to euthanize the 25-pound cubs. Instead, he rescued them.

Casavant phoned the Port Hardy Fire Department for assistance, and after tranquilizing the cubs, Casavant brought them to a vet to be checked out and then to the North Island Wildlife Recovery Association. The association's Julie Mackey has been caring for the bears. ‘They're doing really well. They're feeding for us and their [sic] playing and they're showing no signs of problem behavior at all." The bears are doing well, but their rescuer has been suspended from his job. Read More.


Take a Summer Road Trip: See the Real Florida


The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition team went on a road trip last spring, crossing the state on the most natural type of highway: the proposed Florida Wildlife Corridor. After more than 1,000 miles of hiking, biking and paddling their way from the Everglades Headwaters to the Gulf Islands National Seashore in the Panhandle, the Expedition team members have suggested two locations for families and others to enjoy Florida’s natural beauty: St. Mark’s National Wildlife Refuge (850-925-6121) and Econfina Creek (850-722-9032).


Audubon Suggests Some Summer Options


Audubon has suggested eight summer birding trails
and eight books to read for those staying closer to home.


Seasonal changes do occur in Central Florida, no matter what our relatives up north say about their absence. Keeping track of the subtle changes in the natural landscape over the calendar year is instinctive to me, and a process that I plan to share in a series of articles on the website.

ADAPTABLE SPECIES — Late July 2015 Edition

BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY: LANDSCAPE LEVEL INFLUENCES — Late June 2015 Edition

BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY: HABITAT INFLUENCES — Early May 2015 Edition

WEKIVA BASIN SWAMPS — Early April 2015 Edition

SPRING HAS SPRUNG — Early March Edition



The Wekiva River

Get to know it!

Events & Programs

Next Board Meeting:
August 6th, 2015 at 6 p.m .
SPECIAL PROGRAM
See events

The Friends of Wekiva River have been working closely with the Rotary Club of Seminole County South to form the Wekiva River Promise. The project is to educate on the effects of nitrates and promote personal stewardship to ensure the enjoyment of the River for years to come!
Copyright 2011 © Friends of Wekiva River. All rights reserved.