Friends of the Wekiva River Logo
Wekiva River
Wekiva River, Florida

The Wekiva River is a National treasure. This river boasts beautiful vistas and unique ecosystems.

enjoying-the-wekiva-river
Enjoying the River

Help us protect this amazing river so we can all enjoy the river for many more years to come!

Open Space
Navtive Plants

The Wekiva Basin is filled with gorgeous flora and fauna.

Orchids
Otter frolicking

Join us for one of our monthly field trips!

Volunteer FOWR-Volunteers


Ambassadors Program

In 2015, FOWR will launch our Environmental Ambassadors Program. This program will provide students the chance to get involved in protecting and promoting the health of the Wekiva River Basin. Click here for more information.

Current Issues

Even with these protections and existing rules and regulations, the environmental quality of the Wekiva basin continues to be threatened. Click here for some current issues.

Links


Upcoming Events

  • November 11-13, 2016
    Family Campout, Wekiva Springs State Park.

A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE WITHIN FLORIDA 800-435-7352. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. REGISTRATION NUMBER CH42991

 

 

Welcome Note

Since 1982 the Friends of the Wekiva River have worked to protect, preserve, and restore the natural functions and beauty of the Wekiva River system. As a result of our leadership and the cooperation of our river partners, the Wekiva is designated a Florida Outstanding Water, a Florida Canoe Trail, a Florida Wild and Scenic River, and a National Wild and Scenic River with over 70,000 acres of state-protected lands in the basin. Despite this ample recognition, the Wekiva River and its fragile ecosystem face numerous threats.

These include the fragmentation and loss of habitat, declines in spring flow, degradation in water quality, and wildlife mortality on the roads. read more.


Upcoming Wekiva Revealed Family Campout

Commune with nature and learn some of her secrets during this weekend of activities. Friday, November 11 - Sunday, November 13, 2016 at Wekiva Springs State Park. For more information, click here. To RSVP, email FOWR@gmail.com or call 407-322-4086


Florida’s Forgotten Coast: Return to Wild Florida

FOWR along with the Center for Earth Jurisprudence, Florida Wildlife Corridor, Seminole Audubon Society, Orange Audubon Society, Sierra Club Central Florida Group, League of Women Voters of Orange and Seminole Counties co-sponsored the Central Florida screening of Florida’s Forgotten Coast: Return to Wild Florida at the Orlando Science Center on May 10. There was an amazing turnout, filling the auditorium for 2 showings.

This important documentary reminds us that Florida’s wildlife corridors are essential for nature and humans. The evening included a panel discussion during which Dr. Jay Exum highlighted the Wekiva-Ocala Greenway, a vital wildlife corridor closer to home. The Wekiva-Ocala Greenway connects the Wekiva Basin and the Ocala National Forest. It contains dozens of natural springs he greatest expanse of sand pine scrub in the world, and the largest black bear population in Florida. It is an area filled with life of all sizes that are dependent on the preservation of this corridor. The properties included in the Wekiva-Ocala Greenway have been delineated for a number of year and been on the Florida Forever priority list for purchase.

We hope the viewing of this film and learning of the importance of the Wekiva-Ocala Greenway will motivate support for the use of Amendment 1 money (2014 Water and Land Conservation Amendment) to fund Florida Forever. The proceeds from this event will be donated to the League of Conservation Education Fund.


Hiking Pristine Ecosystems

Just a few miles away from downtown Orlando, there are outdoor recreation opportunities that will take you into the middle of a Florida wilderness that looks like it did 500 years ago. Carefully planned within Wekiwa Springs State Park and Seminole State Forest are hiking trails that allow a long, inspirational immersion into relatively pristine habitats within the Wekiva River basin.

Now somewhat renowned across the state for its relatively high black bear population, these two conservation lands are part of an ecological corridor that stretches to the Ocala National Forest. 75,000 acres of state lands and dozens of miles of trails provide an opportunity for all kinds of wilderness-oriented recreation experiences: equestrian, off road cycling, hiking, birdwatching, camping, canoeing and kayaking. Read more.


Seasonal changes do occur in Central Florida, no matter what our relatives up north say about their absence. Keeping track of the subtle changes in the natural landscape over the calendar year is instinctive to me, and a process that I plan to share in a series of articles on the website.

YEAR END SUMMARY

WINTER IN FLORIDA — Late January 2016 Edition

CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT RESULTS — December 2015 Edition

CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT — November 2015 Edition

FALL IN FLORIDA — October 2015 Edition

SUMMER RAINS AND WETLAND HYDROLOGY — September 2015 Edition

COYOTES IN THE WEKIVA BASIN — August 2015 Edition

ADAPTABLE SPECIES — Late July 2015 Edition

BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY: LANDSCAPE LEVEL INFLUENCES — Late June 2015 Edition

BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY: HABITAT INFLUENCES — Early May 2015 Edition

WEKIVA BASIN SWAMPS — Early April 2015 Edition

SPRING HAS SPRUNG — Early March Edition



The Wekiva River

Get to know it!

Events & Programs

Next Board Meeting:
June 2nd, 2016 at 6 p.m .
SPECIAL PROGRAM
See events

The Friends of Wekiva River have been working closely with the Rotary Club of Seminole County South to form the Wekiva River Promise. The project is to educate on the effects of nitrates and promote personal stewardship to ensure the enjoyment of the River for years to come!
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