Friends of the Wekiva River Logo
Wekiva River
Wekiva River, Florida

The Wekiva River is a National treasure. This river boasts beautiful vistas and unique ecosystems.

enjoying-the-wekiva-river
Enjoying the River

Help us protect this amazing river so we can all enjoy the river for many more years to come!

Open Space
Navtive Plants

The Wekiva Basin is filled with gorgeous flora and fauna.

Orchids
Otter frolicking

Join us for one of our monthly field trips!

Volunteer FOWR-Volunteers


Ambassadors Program

In 2015, FOWR will launch our Environmental Ambassadors Program. This program will provide students the chance to get involved in protecting and promoting the health of the Wekiva River Basin.

Click here for more information.

Links


Upcoming Events

  • Birds, Butterflies and Burial Field Trip
    Sunday, May 17, 2015
    9-11 AM
  • SPRING 2015 LAKE
    RESTORATION EVENTS

    Save the dates! Saturday mornings.
    March - May
  • FYN/FFL WINTER CLASSES
    New FREE classes offered through
    Florida Friendly Landscaping

A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE WITHIN FLORIDA 800-435-7352. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. REGISTRATION NUMBER CH42991

 

 

Welcome Note

Since 1982 the Friends of the Wekiva River have worked to protect, preserve, and restore the natural functions and beauty of the Wekiva River system. As a result of our leadership and the cooperation of our river partners, the Wekiva is designated a Florida Outstanding Water, a Florida Canoe Trail, a Florida Wild and Scenic River, and a National Wild and Scenic River with over 70,000 acres of state-protected lands in the basin. Despite this ample recognition, the Wekiva River and its fragile ecosystem face numerous threats.

These include the fragmentation and loss of habitat, declines in spring flow, degradation in water quality, and wildlife mortality on the roads. read more.


MARKHAM MYSTERIES

Kevin Wilson, a 2014 graduate of Rollins College with a bachelor’s degree in environmental studies who works in the conservation field, will share his research into the lives and rarely told history of the people of the former Markham community at the 6:15 p.m. July 9 meeting of Friends of the Wekiva River at the Markham Woods Seventh-day Adventist Church at 505 Markham Woods Road, Longwood. Wilson will draw from an essay he is writing on the historic and ecological treasure of Markham to bring to light the people who lived there, their history, their struggled, and the threats facing this Central Florida landmark today. Wilson has discovered insights into the community’s namesake, William Markham, as well as the turpentine community and its cemetery for the working folks who toiled there in hopes of properly memorializing their contribution to Central Florida. His focus is an eight hundred-acre rectangle of oaks, pines, and palmetto bordering the Wekiva River that has survived suburban development. The talk is free and open to everyone. Guests are welcome to stay for the monthly board meeting of the FOWR after the talk. For details, call 407-677-4004.

Central Florida's Water Agency Roils with Resignations

Yesterday, Robert Christianson, Hal Wilkening, Peggy White, Tom Bartol and Jeff Cole were told to resign or be fired from the St. Johns River Water Management District staff. The deed was done by Mike Register, appointed interim director after Hans Tanzler's unexpected resignation. Odds are that Hans was unwilling to do this dirty deed, effectively disassembling some of the key capabilities and competencies of SJRWMD. Stories are mixed on whether the order for this irresponsible action came from the Governor's office and/or DEP in Tallahassee, or whether District Board Chair John Miklos, an Orlando based environmental consultant, carried this out at the behest of utilities and land development interests. Either way, it is easy to see what is going on. If you take away the institutional memory and competencies Robert Christianson brought to the district, it becomes much more difficult to buy land, and much easier to get rid of key tracts of conservation land by selling them as surplus. Take away the water resources expertise of Hal WIkening, and the possibility that the district will deny consumptive use permits to utilities who want to drain the aquifer even at the cost of drying up our springs becomes highly unlikely. Take away the modeling expertise of Tom Bartol, and the district is unlikely to even know how much water is left in the aquifer to dole out to the utilities and other consumptive users. That is clearly someone's game plan. Hopefully some good investigative reporters will pinpoint "who knew what and when". In the meantime, if there is one ounce of environmental conscience remaining in DEP and the Governor's office, they will order that these deplorable decisions be reversed immediately.

Read more


Seasonal changes do occur in Central Florida, no matter what our relatives up north say about their absence. Keeping track of the subtle changes in the natural landscape over the calendar year is instinctive to me, and a process that I plan to share in a series of articles on the website.

BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY: LANDSCAPE LEVEL INFLUENCES — Late June 2015 Edition

BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY: HABITAT INFLUENCES — Early May 2015 Edition

WEKIVA BASIN SWAMPS — Early April 2015 Edition

SPRING HAS SPRUNG — Early March Edition



The Wekiva River

Get to know it!

Events & Programs

Next Board Meeting:
July 9th, 2015 at 6 p.m .
SPECIAL PROGRAM
See events

The Friends of Wekiva River have been working closely with the Rotary Club of Seminole County South to form the Wekiva River Promise. The project is to educate on the effects of nitrates and promote personal stewardship to ensure the enjoyment of the River for years to come!
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