Skip to content
FOWR Banner Image

Watch a Video

Welcome

Since 1982 the Friends of the Wekiva River have worked to protect, preserve, and restore the natural functions and beauty of the Wekiva River system. As a result of our leadership and the cooperation of our river partners, the Wekiva is designated a Florida Outstanding Water, a Florida Canoe Trail, an Aquatic Preserve, and a National Wild and Scenic River with over 70,000 acres of state-protected lands in the basin.
Despite this ample recognition, the Wekiva River and its fragile ecosystem face numerous threats. These include the fragmentation and loss of habitat, declines in spring flow, degradation in water quality, and wildlife mortality on the roads. Our members work on issues that affect the Wekiva, ranging from pollution to smart growth to the welfare of wildlife, including bears. Learn more about what we are doing. Read more on our issues page.

Download a PDF

The River

The Wekiva River is one of the few remaining near-pristine river systems in central Florida. Over 110 square miles of its basin are protected as parks, preserves, and state forests. Its headwaters begin at the confluence of Wekiwa Spring Run and Rock Spring Run. Waters creating the Wekiva arise from the Floridan aquifer as clear, freshwater springs and from drainage of its watershed, including adjacent hardwood swamps. Climatic zones of warm temperate and subtropical meet here, and biological diversity of plants and animals is very high as a result.

Blog

Ecology on the Wekiva

Facebooktwittergoogle_plus

:

Aquatic Ecology on Rock Springs Run

 

Our fifth installment of the Friends of the Wekiva River ecology field course series related to aquatic ecology. We paddled portions of Rock Springs Run on Saturday, April 19. Recent rainfall required us to reschedule, and then modify the trip, but this portion of the Wild and Scenic River system did not disappoint. We discussed Rock Springs, a second order magnitude spring, and the contribution its 40 million gallons per day provides to the surface waters of Rock Springs Run. We discussed changes in water quality at the spring and the surface waters along the Run over the last few decades and measures that can be taken to improve them. We took special note of the plants that were flowering during this spring trip. We saw bulltongue, hemlock, pickerelweed, buttonbush, spider lily, sweetbay, spatterdock and other showy flowers during our 4-mile canoe trip. We also noted flower of less conspicuous species such as cattail, rushes, beakrushes, sedges and sawgrass. We discussed the forested floodplain associated with the Wekiva River system and its importance to migratory birds. I mentioned the various warbler species that were observed migrating through central Florida over the last month, and we noted migratory species that had now arrived and will breed here. Birds that we observed or heard included pileated woodpecker, red-bellied woodpecker, Carolina wren, tufted titmouse, red-eyed vireo, white ibis, little blue heron, great egret, tri-colored heron, and a female wood duck with chicks. The rain held off for just long enough for us to finish our paddle, first through the Emerald Cuttowards Rock Springs, and then downstream a couple

 

of miles along Rock Springs Run. We felt the difference between paddling upstream against the powerful flows of a second order of magnitude spring, and the benefit of allowing it to push us downstream. This section of the Wekiva Wild and Scenic River is one of the most scenic with clear water; native, mature forested canopy; and spectacular native wildflowers. Thanks to all that participated - we hope you will continue to enjoy the river and work to sustain its values.

Announcements

TURTLE ALERT: Please be on the lookout for dead softshell turtles. It seems they may have contracted a virus and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the St. Johns River Water Management District are coordinating to find out the hows, whys and wheres. If you do find any dead softshell turtles, please note if they are fresh, dried, and/or scavenged, small or large, gps coordinate if possible, and send the information to Tom.O’Neil@MyFWC.com. Also be on the lookout for sick turtles. Thank you for your help!